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Fixed odds betting terminals addiction quotes

Alert me about debates like this. The debate will be concluded with no question being put. I thank the members from across the parties who have supported my motion and allowed this debate to take place. I also thank the campaign for fairer gambling, which I met last week.

Many of the statistics that I will quote on fixed-odds betting terminals have come from research reports that it has supplied, which I would be happy to forward to any member who would like them. What is a fixed-odds betting terminal? Seventy per cent of the players of those machines say that they would potentially stop playing them if roulette games were removed, so it is clear that casino-style roulette is the main feature, or certainly the main attraction, of FOBTs. Unlike over-the-counter bets, that is completely risk-free profit for the company.

It is important to highlight that I am not against betting shops, betting or having a flutter and nor am I on a crusade to bring the betting industry to its knees. What I am fundamentally against is bookmakers targeting areas of deprivation and high unemployment and keeping shops open solely for the purpose of operating FOBTs.

The betting industry might deny that it targets areas, but the facts speak for themselves. Inverclyde, which is mentioned in the motion and has a population of just over 82,, has 70 FOBTs spread across 19 betting shops. Meanwhile, in Aberdeenshire, which has a population three times that of Inverclyde, there are 78 FOBTs spread across 21 betting shops—just two more shops in an area that has three times the population.

What is the difference between Inverclyde and Aberdeenshire? I suggest that it is the unemployment rate. Surely the betting industry cannot claim that that is sheer coincidence. There are further examples of what I am describing. A comparison of the unemployment levels might reveal the reasons for that.

The shops beam in horse racing from Argentina and show animated races. I do not believe for a minute that shops stay open because customers want to have lots of punts on Argentinian horses or to study the form in cartoon dog racing. It is clear to me that the sole purpose of staying open so late and opening so early is to operate FOBTs.

That is also the firm opinion of many reformed gamblers. Last week I met a former gambler from Inverclyde. His life was turned upside down by FOBTs and he lost everything, but with the help of Gamblers Anonymous he has come through to the other side. From my conversation with that former gambler, and from reading reports on the issue, I have been alarmed to discover that FOBT users are increasingly likely to be young males and that females are increasingly getting hooked.

I have learned that young apprentices have lost their jobs and that a football club in the Scottish Professional Football League has contacted GA for help for young trainees. The personal human impact of FOBTs and the damage that any form of addiction to them can do to individuals and families are frightening. Some 62 per cent of FOBT players say that they have gambled until all their money has gone, 68 per cent say that if they lose they will chase their losses, 69 per cent say that when they win they want to keep on gambling, and 59 per cent say that they will put whatever they win back in the machine.

It is not just about the impact on individuals. FOBTs also have a damaging effect on the local economy, given that each pound that is spent in such a machine is a pound that is not spent elsewhere in that economy. However, expenditure on FOBTs supports little employment, compared with consumer spending elsewhere in the economy.

How do we tackle FOBTs? I certainly back such an approach. Increasing the time between bets from the current 20 seconds might also help to reduce the amount that is wagered on FOBTs. I back that approach, too; it would give players more time to consider what they are doing. Reducing the maximum bet on the machines is something that the Department for Culture, Media and Sport could do right now.

I also kindly ask members on the Conservative and Liberal Democrat benches to speak to their colleagues at Westminster on the matter. In Scotland, we must consider all the options. Today, I attended a summit that was organised by the Minister for Local Government and Planning on gambling in our town centres.

Although gambling is a reserved matter, licensing and planning are not. I hope that the Parliament can play its part in helping our communities to deal with the machines. I offer my congratulations to Stuart McMillan on securing the debate. The subject is of particular concern to the communities that I represent as well as to those in Inverclyde, so I am pleased to have the opportunity to speak this evening.

The statistics show that the proliferation of bookmakers and the impact of fixed-odds betting terminals are endemic in poorer communities—Stuart McMillan is right to highlight that fact. A recent study by the campaign for fairer gambling demonstrated that people in the poorest parts of Scotland staked almost double the amount on addictive gambling machines that was staked by those in wealthier areas.

The communities of Possilpark and Keppochhill in my constituency rank second and third in the most deprived data zones in Scotland but they have no shortage of fixed-odds betting terminals. Saracen Street alone is estimated to have 31 of them. That the terminals are addictive gambling machines cannot be in question.

It is abhorrent that that profit is being made on the backs of the poorest people in our communities right across the country. Through those actions, the problems that are caused by debt, income inequality, payday lenders, addiction and fixed-odds betting terminals can be addressed, but there is only so much that the city council can do on its own.

It needs the support of the Scottish and United Kingdom Governments, which must act too. I hope that it will lead to local authorities being given the power to use planning and licensing laws to address the proliferation of those predatory industries in our communities. Recently, my council colleagues Chris Kelly and Helen Stephen and I successfully lobbied Glasgow City Council to have its new licensing statement recognise Possilpark as an area of concern because of the disproportionate number of alcohol-selling outlets that it has.

We must take a similarly focused approach to fixed-odds betting. We must also look to the UK Government to take action. In its most recent budget, it acted to increase the tax take from such terminals, but that does nothing to reduce the impact of the terminals in our communities; it merely increases their importance as a cash cow for the Government and perhaps makes it less likely that the Government will act to reduce the misery that they cause.

Unfortunately, we have not seen any signs from the Tory -led Government that it is likely to direct a single penny of that additional revenue to tackling poverty or to addressing addiction. A reduction in the maximum stake could be achieved right now—it would not even need primary legislation. I mentioned that fixed-odds betting terminals are the crack cocaine of gambling addiction.

If there were to be a crack cocaine addiction explosion, Governments would quite rightly act. The explosion in the use of fixed-odds betting terminals in communities such as mine deserves a similarly robust approach. It is incumbent on government at all levels to act to address that growing problem. I very much hope that our debate helps momentum to be gained in that direction. I congratulate Stuart McMillan on securing the debate, because it is an extremely important issue.

I confess that I knew very little about it, so I had to stop and think about it. While I did so, Brechin community council approached me to ask what could be done because it was concerned about such gambling in my home town. I want to slightly widen out the issue that Stuart McMillan has raised.

We seem to be living in a country where gambling has become normalised. Gambling and betting organisations seem to sponsor an awful lot of sport to the point that, when I was recently using my iPhone because I was interested in seeing the world snooker championship results, I found that, in the simple process of moving my finger across the image on my screen, I touched a button that took me straight to an online gambling site.

It was just there—I had not even tried to find it. Perhaps I am a heretic, a puritan or a strange guy or something, but it seems to me that gambling is a rather silly thing to do, unless those gambling know something that the bookies do not. If gamblers know that the machine will give back only 97 per cent of what they have put into it and, as Stuart McMillan has mentioned, most people will keep on putting in the money until it no longer comes out, then banging their heads against a brick wall and throwing their money into a river might at least give people the joy of banging their heads against a brick wall.

It is a crazy occupation. People gamble because they think that they might gain something, because there is an adrenalin rush or perhaps because other people do it, so they think that it is cool to do it, too. However, the only possible result is debt. Citizens Advice Scotland provided a very interesting brief, which explains some of the very sad cases related to gambling. Of course, CAS deals with debt arising from other situations as well. Why on earth would we as a society want to have machines that take the money out of the pockets of people who are not being very sensible and who therefore need a bit of help and advice?

Why are we letting that happen? The gambling industry is similar to the tobacco industry. There is no safe way to use a cigarette. If a person derives a short-term benefit from it, so be it. Some people smoke for a very long time and it does not kill them but, by and large, we know that smoking is an extremely bad idea. I can think of no earthly reason why gambling is a good idea. If someone can advise me otherwise, I ask that they please do so.

When we look at the particular issue of fixed-odds betting machines, there are some specific suggestions. As other members have mentioned them, I will not rehearse the same points. However, if we see such machines as the biggest problem with gambling—I think that is what the statistics say—and we can find ways to reduce the problem by decreasing the size of the bet and by increasing the cycle time, I think that those would be good ideas to progress.

I recognise that the gambling is a reserved matter, so I do not want to be too pointed in my remarks. However, I encourage the Government to consider, particularly if we ever do get the powers to deal with the issue, which I hope we do, how we make gambling as a whole less attractive and more difficult.

How do we get folk to understand that gambling is a daft idea? The bookies are in business because they set the odds in their favour. We see that in spades in fixed-odds betting machines—people are bound to lose. We really should not be doing it, should we? We really should not be allowing it. Therefore, it is a challenge to Government to ask how on earth we are going to stop it. I am not pretending that this is an easy matter. However, the suggestion that such gambling is perfectly legal is a very good reason for ensuring that it is not legal.

I too thank Stuart McMillan for securing the debate. I am clear that there remains a serious case to answer about the potential harm caused by fixed-odds betting terminals, but it is important to ensure balance in any discussion. Naturally, we are all concerned about the figures that have been mentioned.

However, any action that is taken in response must be based on evidence. The gambling industry is an industry that provides jobs and pays taxes—indeed, it will pay more taxes under measures that the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced recently. It is an industry that, if run responsibly, can provide a safe and enjoyable leisure activity. Shares in the main gambling companies fell in early trading on Thursday, with William Hill, down nearly 9 percent at one stage, hit hardest before swinging back into credit.

London-listed gambling stocks have had a topsy-turvy week, surging on Monday after the Supreme Court paved the way to legalize sports betting in the United States. With tighter curbs and higher taxes in their home market, the companies are likely to seek to expand across the Atlantic.

I said already on Wednesday it was considering merging its U. There are over 8, betting shops in Britain and companies are allowed to install a maximum of four machines per shop. Ladbrokes Coral, bought by GVC for close to 4 billion pounds late last year, operates close to 3, high street betting shops across the UK, employing over 25, people.

William Hill has around 2, betting shops employing over 12, people. William Hill said the new regulation could lead to a 35 to 45 percent reduction in annual total gaming net revenue. It said that the limit could result in around of its high streets shops becoming loss-making.

GVC said cutting the top stake on gambling machines would mean a reduction of around million pounds in its core earnings in the first full year. The clearer regulatory picture could however facilitate a further round of consolidation in the British gambling sector. The government, which said the move would need parliamentary approval, pledged to engage with the gambling industry to ensure it was given sufficient time to implement and complete the technological changes.

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I hope that it will lead to local authorities being given the power to use planning and licensing laws to address the proliferation of those predatory industries in our communities. Recently, my council colleagues Chris Kelly and Helen Stephen and I successfully lobbied Glasgow City Council to have its new licensing statement recognise Possilpark as an area of concern because of the disproportionate number of alcohol-selling outlets that it has.

We must take a similarly focused approach to fixed-odds betting. We must also look to the UK Government to take action. In its most recent budget, it acted to increase the tax take from such terminals, but that does nothing to reduce the impact of the terminals in our communities; it merely increases their importance as a cash cow for the Government and perhaps makes it less likely that the Government will act to reduce the misery that they cause.

Unfortunately, we have not seen any signs from the Tory -led Government that it is likely to direct a single penny of that additional revenue to tackling poverty or to addressing addiction. A reduction in the maximum stake could be achieved right now—it would not even need primary legislation. I mentioned that fixed-odds betting terminals are the crack cocaine of gambling addiction. If there were to be a crack cocaine addiction explosion, Governments would quite rightly act.

The explosion in the use of fixed-odds betting terminals in communities such as mine deserves a similarly robust approach. It is incumbent on government at all levels to act to address that growing problem. I very much hope that our debate helps momentum to be gained in that direction. I congratulate Stuart McMillan on securing the debate, because it is an extremely important issue.

I confess that I knew very little about it, so I had to stop and think about it. While I did so, Brechin community council approached me to ask what could be done because it was concerned about such gambling in my home town. I want to slightly widen out the issue that Stuart McMillan has raised. We seem to be living in a country where gambling has become normalised. Gambling and betting organisations seem to sponsor an awful lot of sport to the point that, when I was recently using my iPhone because I was interested in seeing the world snooker championship results, I found that, in the simple process of moving my finger across the image on my screen, I touched a button that took me straight to an online gambling site.

It was just there—I had not even tried to find it. Perhaps I am a heretic, a puritan or a strange guy or something, but it seems to me that gambling is a rather silly thing to do, unless those gambling know something that the bookies do not.

If gamblers know that the machine will give back only 97 per cent of what they have put into it and, as Stuart McMillan has mentioned, most people will keep on putting in the money until it no longer comes out, then banging their heads against a brick wall and throwing their money into a river might at least give people the joy of banging their heads against a brick wall. It is a crazy occupation. People gamble because they think that they might gain something, because there is an adrenalin rush or perhaps because other people do it, so they think that it is cool to do it, too.

However, the only possible result is debt. Citizens Advice Scotland provided a very interesting brief, which explains some of the very sad cases related to gambling. Of course, CAS deals with debt arising from other situations as well. Why on earth would we as a society want to have machines that take the money out of the pockets of people who are not being very sensible and who therefore need a bit of help and advice?

Why are we letting that happen? The gambling industry is similar to the tobacco industry. There is no safe way to use a cigarette. If a person derives a short-term benefit from it, so be it. Some people smoke for a very long time and it does not kill them but, by and large, we know that smoking is an extremely bad idea.

I can think of no earthly reason why gambling is a good idea. If someone can advise me otherwise, I ask that they please do so. When we look at the particular issue of fixed-odds betting machines, there are some specific suggestions. As other members have mentioned them, I will not rehearse the same points.

However, if we see such machines as the biggest problem with gambling—I think that is what the statistics say—and we can find ways to reduce the problem by decreasing the size of the bet and by increasing the cycle time, I think that those would be good ideas to progress.

I recognise that the gambling is a reserved matter, so I do not want to be too pointed in my remarks. However, I encourage the Government to consider, particularly if we ever do get the powers to deal with the issue, which I hope we do, how we make gambling as a whole less attractive and more difficult.

How do we get folk to understand that gambling is a daft idea? The bookies are in business because they set the odds in their favour. We see that in spades in fixed-odds betting machines—people are bound to lose. We really should not be doing it, should we? We really should not be allowing it. Therefore, it is a challenge to Government to ask how on earth we are going to stop it.

I am not pretending that this is an easy matter. However, the suggestion that such gambling is perfectly legal is a very good reason for ensuring that it is not legal. I too thank Stuart McMillan for securing the debate. I am clear that there remains a serious case to answer about the potential harm caused by fixed-odds betting terminals, but it is important to ensure balance in any discussion. Naturally, we are all concerned about the figures that have been mentioned.

However, any action that is taken in response must be based on evidence. The gambling industry is an industry that provides jobs and pays taxes—indeed, it will pay more taxes under measures that the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced recently. It is an industry that, if run responsibly, can provide a safe and enjoyable leisure activity.

After all, gambling is legal. That is why, although I support the intention behind the motion—indeed, I have signed it—I have some observations to make. The suggestion that it is possible to gamble. Can machines be loaded that quickly?

I do not know. Is there evidence to that effect? If so, let us see it. It is clear that it is possible to gamble considerable amounts of money in relatively short periods of time in other ways—for example, at traditional casinos, at horse races or online—but I accept that there is particular concern about fixed-odds machines.

It is important that robust player protections are put in place. Although the number of betting shops is not rising significantly, there is a feeling that they are becoming a more obvious feature of our towns and cities and they are handling greater and greater sums of money.

That is why, last year, the UK Government launched a consultation to shed some light on the use of fixed-odds machines. That was important, because we must ensure that any action that is taken is proportionate, effective and evidence based. The consultation did not provide clear evidence for a way forward. In particular, evidence was not forthcoming that there was a direct link between FOBTs and problem gambling.

It appears that problem gambling is not higher among those people who play fixed-odds machines. It was found that the vast majority of users played them occasionally and spent relatively modest sums. Research confirms that those who have a gambling problem—we should be quite clear that that is serious—use a variety of products. The UK Government has taken steps, including the implementing of a voluntary code, and I understand that it is looking closely at whether other measures should be introduced.

I accept that the regulation of gambling is a reserved matter, but action can be taken in Scotland to promote responsible gambling. The Scottish ministers and, through them, licensing boards have the power to set fees and licence conditions for all gambling premises, and it is within their power to refuse licences on the basis of risk to vulnerable groups. Local authorities also have the power to grant a licence that includes additional conditions.

As the motion notes, there is a need to increase awareness of problem gambling and to improve support to those who have a problem. It is good that the Scottish health survey now collects information on the issue, which is available, and I commend the work of organisations such as Gamblers Anonymous , with which a number of us have engaged. They do excellent work in educating people about the potential dangers of gambling and providing support to those who have a problem. That work is every bit as important as any restrictions that might be contemplated for betting shops in our high streets.

Good evening, Presiding Officer. I thank Stuart McMillan for securing the debate on a topic that is a major issue for my constituents in Glasgow. They are sometimes referred to as the crack cocaine of gambling because of the speed at which large sums of money can be lost and their highly addictive roulette content, which mean that they make a higher contribution to problem gambling than any other form of gambling.

FOBT gambling is the main source of revenue for betting shops, so no wonder the bookmakers defend it so vigorously. The Association of British Bookmakers states that betting shops do not target deprived areas, but that is clearly untrue, as there are more than twice the number of betting shops in poorer areas of Scotland than there are in the most affluent areas.

However, each pound that is spent on FOBTs, net of winnings, is, by definition, a pound that is not spent elsewhere in the economy. Increases in spending on FOBTs are likely to destroy jobs in the British economy rather than create them. That is far from the truth. The betting shops are real and are devastating our communities.

Something needs to be done to stop them. Therefore, I support the motion. Like other members, I will start by thanking Stuart McMillan for raising the issue. I thank him in particular, but I also thank other members around the chamber, who have made very thoughtful and pointed comments. He pointed out the correlation between fixed-odds betting terminals and areas of poverty and deprivation.

That was echoed by Hanzala Malik and Patricia Ferguson. There seems to be something stark there, whether we are talking about the Inverclyde-Aberdeenshire divide or the point that Patricia Ferguson made about Keppochhill and Possil. That is an issue, and we have to tackle it. As has been said, the matter is reserved, but there are actions that can and doubtless will be taken, whether by local authorities or by us. I welcome the support that has been given to the summit that my ministerial colleague held.

I can confirm to Patricia Ferguson that I have no doubt that Derek Mackay will be happy to keep her in the loop. The problem is not one that only we in Scotland face. I think that Nigel Don showed that the issue is global. It is not simply a matter of what we get on the internet; we can hardly watch a sporting event without seeing the portrayal of gambling. That is certainly the case with professional football.

As Annabel Goldie said, it is a matter of balance to some extent. The Scottish Government is not anti-gambling. There are many types of gambling addiction. Find out how to identify an addiction, how to recognize compulsive gambling, and your treatment options here.

FACT: 6 million adults and , teens meet the criteria for gambling addiction. Gambling addiction is one of the hardest problems to stop. It can be an all-consuming behavior that can result in some very bad consequences. Here are ten ways to stop gambling forever. Gambling Addiction. Online Casino Games.

Signs Of Addiction. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Gambling Sites Online Gambling.

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Several former ministers - including Boris Johnson, Iain Duncan Smith and Justine Greening - tabled amendments designed to force the government to make the change from April. Fixed-odds terminals were introduced in casinos and betting shops in , and offer computerised games at the touch of a button. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said: "The government has listened and will now implement the reduction in April Mr Wright added that a planned increase in Remote Gaming Duty, paid by online gaming firms, would be brought forward to April to cover the negative impact on the public finances.

Ms Crouch said she welcomed the decision and was pleased that "common sense" had prevailed. Asked if she would like to return to Government, Ms Crouch said: "There isn't a vacancy. That's been filled. So, I will just get on and do what I'm going to do. The government had earlier said it had consulted widely and considered "all of the evidence" before making its decision on a timeframe. Mrs May answered: "I recognise the strength of feeling on this issue. I know gambling addiction can devastate lives.

FOBTs were introduced into betting shops in Since then, the number has grown to 33, in Great Britain. FOBTs have been under criticism for encouraging high-stakes gambling and exposing people to the risk of gambling harm. The machines have been called the "crack cocaine" of gambling by campaigners who say they let players lose money too quickly, leading to addiction and social problems. The government began to look at FOBT machines in October , when it made a "call for evidence" on the number and location of terminals and the measures in place to protect players.

Tom Watson MP, Labour's Shadow Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary, said it had taken "the resignation of a good minister and a cross party revolt to achieve the blindingly obvious and necessary reforms to fixed-odds betting terminals". He added it was "a very good day for the many thousands of people whose families and communities are blighted by gambling addiction".

It was for Christmas presents. For my son, my wife. In person, Franklin appears a charming rogue with a gift for one-liners. He began in the early s by bouncing cheques, then graduated to running up tens of thousands of pounds in overdrafts. The companies wanted customers and were basically paying you to sign up.

They only woke up to it when the courier company tried delivering phones to my house. There are now about 35, of these terminals in Britain. This, experts noted, compared with 0. Staff who worked with people who had problems with gambling reported that their families were at risk of anxiety and depression. This is an illness. Problem gamblers are sick and as with any illness I did not choose to be sick. In , for the first time, the US Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders recognised gambling as an addiction on a par with drugs and alcohol.

I have been homeless, living on the streets. It has had a huge impact on my family, my parents, my wife, my son. I lose control when I gamble. Eventually, things got so bad that he left the country — determined to start afresh in eastern Europe with his wife.

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Its chief executive, Malcolm George, said: "The report is the view of a tiny group of anti-betting shop MPs. Watch Live. Fixed-odds betting terminals report is 'rigged' say bookmakers As MPs demand laws to limit stakes on fixed-odds betting terminals, the industry argues the findings are flawed and threaten jobs. By James Sillars, Business Reporter. Fill 2 Copy 11 Created with Sketch.

Wednesday 1 February , UK. Why you can trust Sky News. Mr Wright added that a planned increase in Remote Gaming Duty, paid by online gaming firms, would be brought forward to April to cover the negative impact on the public finances. Ms Crouch said she welcomed the decision and was pleased that "common sense" had prevailed.

Asked if she would like to return to Government, Ms Crouch said: "There isn't a vacancy. That's been filled. So, I will just get on and do what I'm going to do. The government had earlier said it had consulted widely and considered "all of the evidence" before making its decision on a timeframe.

Mrs May answered: "I recognise the strength of feeling on this issue. I know gambling addiction can devastate lives. FOBTs were introduced into betting shops in Since then, the number has grown to 33, in Great Britain.

FOBTs have been under criticism for encouraging high-stakes gambling and exposing people to the risk of gambling harm. The machines have been called the "crack cocaine" of gambling by campaigners who say they let players lose money too quickly, leading to addiction and social problems. The government began to look at FOBT machines in October , when it made a "call for evidence" on the number and location of terminals and the measures in place to protect players.

Tom Watson MP, Labour's Shadow Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary, said it had taken "the resignation of a good minister and a cross party revolt to achieve the blindingly obvious and necessary reforms to fixed-odds betting terminals". He added it was "a very good day for the many thousands of people whose families and communities are blighted by gambling addiction". Tory rebellion over betting machines.

Pro-betting MPs more persuasive - Crouch. What has the government done?

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Fixed-odds betting terminals report is 'rigged' say bookmakers As MPs. It added that all bookmakers. PARAGRAPHGAA star calls for gambling law change. High online sports bet sites for fixed-odds betting. Ang sa investment scheme stu center dialectic investments status monitor. Crash proof investments club vest strategies kia kuwait investment authority. Its chief executive, Malcolm George, said: "The report is the suit of anti-betting shop MPs. The Association of British Bookmakers ABB warned of thousands of demand laws to limit stakes if the study's recommendations were industry argues the findings are flawed and threaten jobs. By James Sillars, Business Reporter. Fill 2 Copy 11 Created here are expected to follow.

Crack cocaine of gambling quote Fixed-Odds Betting Terminals (FOBTs) – the electronic Addiction By Design: Machine Gambling In Las Vegas, Natasha Dow. The amount lost by gamblers on Fixed Odds Betting Terminals (FOBTs) last year. “With addiction, it's about the length of time between bet and. FOBTs, or machines as they were classified under the Gambling Act are 'touch- a #child who may be or is an #addict We hope this outline is helpful to you.